Beatrice Bests the Burglars

As I mentioned in my last post, as I do research for the next full-length novel, I am going to be writing four new short stories featuring minor characters from my Victorian San Francisco Mystery series. I am pleased to announce that I have finished the first story. On September 15, in celebration of International Cozy Mystery Day, I will be sending out an email to my newsletter subscribers with instructions on how to receive an ARC (Advanced Reader’s Copy) of this story—Beatrice Bests the Burglars––for Free. So, if you are interested, and haven’t yet subscribed to my newsletter, you might want to do so right now by clicking HERE. If you subscribe, you will get instructions on how to get the first volume of short stories (including Madam Sibyl’s First Client, Dandy Detects, The Misses Moffet Mend a Marriage, Read more…

Introducing Chirp–A new way to find great deals on Audiobooks

Starting today, the new audiobook version of Maids of Misfortune will be only 99 cents on Chirpbooks.com–-an audiobook promotion website that has recently been started by the folks who run BookBub.com, the premier ebook promotion company. This sale will last for just a few weeks. For those of you who like to listen to audio books, I highly recommend that you take a look at how Chirp works. Unlike Audible or some other companies, there are no membership or subscription fees. The discounts on audiobooks range from 99 cents to $4.99, and once you have bought the audiobook, it remains in your library (you have bought it not borrowed it.) You can ask Chirp to email you daily or weekly with the new deals within the categories you have chosen, or you can just go to the site and see Read more…

Discounts for Spring 2019

First of all, thanks to everyone who has bought the most recent book in my Victorian San Francisco mystery series, Scholarly Pursuits, and said such nice things about it in comments and reviews. This certainly motivates me to get right back to writing. I am currently doing research on women in the medical professions in San Francisco for the next mystery, while working on the sequel to the novella I co-wrote with my daughter,  The Stars are Red Tonight, which is set in the Paradisi Chronicles universe. And the first two discounts I wanted to tell you about are on Between Mountain and Sea, the first book in my Caelesis series. For a limited time, the ebook edition, which is currently only found on Kindle, is on the Prime Reading list. What that means is that if you subscribe to Amazon Prime you Read more…

When Men will be Boys: Masculinity and Late 19th Century Fraternities

When I started research on my newest book, Scholarly Pursuits, the sixth novel in my Victorian San Francisco Mystery series, my only agenda was to take some of my series characters across the San Francisco Bay to solve a crime on the University of California campus at Berkeley. I was primarily curious about what life was like for college students in 1881, and since my mystery series focuses on women and their experiences in this period, I assumed I would mostly deal with what life was like for my female characters. (If interested in this topic, see this post.) What I did not expect was to find myself researching college fraternities and the role they played in the emergence of a new kind of hyper-masculinity among young men of the late nineteenth century. In fact, if you had asked me before Read more…

Who were the Women Attending Berkeley in 1880-81?

In Scholarly Pursuits (now available), I set the mystery on the University of California campus at Berkeley during the spring term of 1881. The university, first opened in 1863, didn’t enroll any women until 1870, and between 1874 and 1881, only ten percent of the bachelor’s degrees granted by the university went to women. This is not surprising, given that one of the decade’s most popular books was Sex in Education (1873), a book by Edward Clarke, a Harvard medical school physician, who argued that women who were educated in the same fashion as men would face an inability to conceive and produce healthy children, life-long illness, and possible death. Clarke only produced anecdotal evidence to support his claims, nevertheless, his views gave a veneer of science to already held prejudices against women attending institutions of higher education, particularly co-educational institutions Read more…