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mlouisalocke_bks_medWelcome to my Front Parlor, where I hope to engage you in some stimulating conversations about my journey as an indie author, the lessons learned about marketing, and the joys of writing fiction. The past five years have been enormously rewarding, with the publication of four novels in my Victorian San Francisco Mystery series Maids of Misfortune, Uneasy SpiritsBloody Lessons, and Deadly Proof, a short story collection, Victorian San Francisco Stories, and the forthcoming publication of my first science fiction novel, Between Mountain and Sea. Do come in, look around, comment, and before you go, please leave a visiting card (url, twitter, fb address, etc) so I can return the courtesy and visit you next time.          

2017 Goals #2: Do More Recreational Reading

child_with_red_hair_readingIn my goal setting post last January, my third goal was to do more recreational reading. And that is a goal I can definitely say I accomplished. The primary reason for that success was that I discovered the fun and convenience of reading short stories.

While I have written short stories—about minor characters from my Victorian San Francisco mystery series––and I have even written about why I like to write short stories in this blog post, I hadn’t actually read many short stories for years…maybe decades.

In fact, except for a number of years in my youth when I found the time to read the New Yorker from cover to cover (including the short stories), I don’t really remember when I ever chose short stories for my recreational reading––certainly not mystery and science fiction short stories.

So, what caused the change in my reading habits in 2016?

First, ever since I retired from teaching and started writing full-time, I stopped finding the time to read for pleasure. I read non-fiction as research, other authors’ works as a beta reader, but not fiction for the pure joy of it.

Trying to figure out why, I determined that one of the reasons for this is that I have never liked to start reading a story when I know I won’t have the time to finish it right away. I am not one of those readers who is content to spend weeks slowly making my way through a novel.

I solved this problem when I was a busy history professor by binge reading fiction over holidays and summer vacations and during the rare days I was too sick to go into work. However, once I started my second career as a writer, things like holidays and summer vacations became irrelevant, and I started working seven days a week, fifty-two weeks a year. (The reason for that is for another post!)

In short, without really even thinking about it, I began avoiding novel that weren’t directly related to my writing because that would mean a couple of days when I wasn’t making progress on the newest manuscript or working away at my long marketing to-do list. As a result, I got out of the habit of reading strictly for pleasure.

But then in 2015, I discovered the Future Chronicles, a series of science fiction/fantasy anthologies published by Samuel Peralta. Peralta had expressed interest in publishing an anthology of short stories in the Paradisi Chronicles series, the open-source science fiction world I helped create that year. It only seemed sensible to read some of the anthologies he’d published to see if this felt like a good fit for those of us writing in the Paradisi World. (Here is a blog post about this series and the subsequent Chronicle Worlds: Paradisi anthology Peralta published.)

While this decision was work related, what I hadn’t expected is how much I would enjoy these short stories. And rather than just reading one or two stories in a couple of the anthologies, I went on during the rest of 2016 to read all of the stories in twelve of the anthologies. And in the process I discovered that I had solved my problem of how to continue to read fiction for pleasure because with a short story, I could start and finish the story in one sitting.

So simple, but up until then, I stupidly thought of short stories as something you found in print magazines (I am showing my age here). And, when I had a small window of time to read, the only magazine in our house with fiction in it was the New Yorker. And I had stopped enjoying their stories decades ago.

This is where ebooks and my Kindle came into play in changing my reading habits.

I have blogged about why I like having a Kindle so much—but frankly recently I was primarily using it to read novels the four or so times a year I was traveling to see my daughter and grandchildren (or got a bad cold.) So my foray into reading Future Chronicles anthologies was the first time I used my Kindle to read short stories by other authors.

And lo and behold, I started reading these short stories in those short windows of time: you know––the twenty minutes or so I was sitting in a doctor’s waiting room, while I ate lunch, when my husband is watching the news (and I had had enough news for the day), and during the hour of insomnia that seems to be accompanying my aging process with distressing regularity.

And over the past year, with just finding one or two of these short intervals of time a day, I have read 144 short stories in the Future Chronicles, a fun bundle of Christmas short stories, and the stories in two issues of the Fiction River: An Original Anthology Magazine. Oh, and I also read all of the Paradisi Chronicle short stories that ended up in the anthology Peralta published for us.

And, like priming a pump, reading these short stories in the science fiction genre has actually encouraged me to take more time off to read full-length novels. As a result, this past year, I have also re-read through the entire William Gibson canon, read all three books in Ilona Andrews’ Innkeeper Chronicles, all eight books in Lindsay Buroker’s Fallen Empire series, and all the books in Kristine Kathryn Rusch’s Diving Universe series.

Now you will notice the preponderance of science fiction in my recreational reading, which reflects the fact that this year I have been primarily writing in that genre: including my own short story, “Aelwyd: Home,” for Chronicle Worlds: Paradisi, the novella, The Stars are Red Tonight, that I co-wrote with my daughter in the Paradisi Chronicles series, and my current WIP, Under Two Moons, which is the sequel to the full-length Paradisi novel, Between Mountain and Sea, I published in 2015.

Reading other science fiction work has been a great source of inspiration for my own writing, while also bringing me a good deal of joy as a reader.

But by late this spring I will be back doing the research for my next book in my Victorian San Francisco Mystery series. So time to branch out.

I would therefore love to hear some recommendations for short story collections of historical fiction or mysteries, since I am ready to make 2017 and even greater year for recreational reading!

M. Louisa Locke, January 19, 2017

2017 Goals #1: Writing More Blog Posts

newspaper-clip-art-1201187650_b7db851855Once I start to think about goals for a new year, I start to think about goals I failed to achieve in the previous year. And one of those goals was to blog more frequently. Well, guess what? Having written only 6 blog posts of substance in 2016 (only about half the number I did in 2015), I think I can firmly say that goal wasn’t met!

However, being the analytical person that I am, I decided to blog a bit about why I think that happened.

First, when I began blogging in December of 2009, I was primarily detailing my own journey as an independent author, in a time when we were rare enough creatures to actually be quite interesting to others.

Second, I soon discovered a few selling strategies that were working very well for me that not everyone had heard of (for example, using free short stories to hook readers, tweaking categories to help make a book more visible, using KDP Select marketing tools), and as a result I felt that I had something valuable to share with other authors.

And in addition to blogs about my writing journey and strategies, I wrote pieces detailing the historical background to my mystery series, set in Victorian San Francisco. And as my readership for this series grew, positive reactions to these pieces followed.

And frankly, what writer doesn’t like to write about things that other people are interested in reading?

So what happened this year?

Well, first, indie authors are now a dime a dozen, and many indie authors are enormously more successful than I am in terms of books written and sold.

And, not only have most of my strategies been discussed to death in detail elsewhere, but they are no longer as universally applicable, so I feel I have to qualify every piece of advice I give.

In short, I began to find it harder and harder to believe that continuing to tell about my writing journey or providing detailed discussions of my current marketing strategies was of much interest or particular value––or couldn’t be found just as easily on some other author’s blog.

As a result, I found myself hesitating whenever I looked at my to-do list and saw “write a blog post” on it. And what I usually decided was that I would rather spend my time working on my next work of fiction. Or, if I was going to spend time doing something on social media, I would rather do something that takes less time.

Which brings me to the third reason I haven’t been blogging. I take too long on each blog, including the historical ones. Generally, it took me at least a day, if not more, to review what others are writing on a subject, put together my own marketing and selling statistics, or gather together the historical research I have done on a topic. Then at least another day, to write and edit the actual piece.

So each time I get to that “write a blog piece” on my to-do list, I ask myself how many chapters could I write on my WIP in that time? How many facebook posts could I compose? How many pages of someone else’s manuscript could I edit?

Well, you get the point.

Yet the truth is, that I know people still want to hear more about Victorian San Francisco…something I am uniquely qualified to write about. And at least once a week or more I find myself giving marketing advice on different group forums, or answering emails from beginning writers about things they should consider as they make the jump to independent authorship. In short, it does appear that there might be some people who would still find what I have to say on these subjects of value.

So, this year I have decided to try something different. I have decided to try to write a post at least every week. But to only let myself spend one hour researching and writing a draft, and one hour editing that draft, before I hit publish. This might mean simply taking an old marketing post and updating it, or breaking my posts up into smaller segments. Or just trying to be more succinct!

So here goes. Post number one of 2017! And I seem to have completed it in under two hours from start to finish. (Smile)

M. Louisa Locke, January 7, 2017

Oh, and by the way, Maids of Misfortune, the first book in my Victorian San Francisco Mystery series is still perma free everywhere and Between Mountain and Sea, the first book in my Paradisi Chronicles science fiction series is also 99 cents on Kindle for two days, (January 7-8).

A Victorian San Francisco Christmas

victorianchristmastreeBecause the most recent book in my Victorian San Francisco Mystery series, Pilfered Promises, is set during the period between Thanksgiving and Christmas, 1880, I spent a good deal of time researching how residents of that city were celebrating the holidays that year, including looking for articles in the San Francisco Chronicle. What I found was that many of the traditions that we are familiar with today started in the Nineteenth century…including the importance of advertising special holiday sales!

“The Arcade: We are offering this week SPECIAL and EXTRAORDINARY INDUCEMENTS to buyers of HOLIDAY PRESENTS, especially in our SILK DEPARTMENT” ––San Francisco Chronicle, December 19, 1880

However, these traditions were actually relatively new. Before the mid-1880s, most native-born Americans, particularly Protestants from the Northeast, saw Thanksgiving and not Christmas as the key national holiday. In fact, throughout the 1800s, a number of Protestant denominations were very resistant to the celebration of the birth of Christ in any fashion beyond religious observances.

Not surprisingly, it was the Southern state of Louisiana, where there was a significant Catholic population, that first declared December 25th a holiday (in 1837), and Christmas wasn’t declared a national legal holiday until 1875. The huge influx of European immigrants to the United States, starting in the 1840s, many from Catholic countries, also played an important role in shaping the way Christmas began to be celebrated, especially in the larger cities.

This multi-cultural perspective certainly held true for San Francisco in 1880, which makes sense since at that date three-quarters of the city’s population of over 233,000 were immigrants or their native-born children.

The Stocking:

“But the presents would lose half their charm did they not come through the medium of the huge stocking, religiously pinned to the chimney side…” ––San Francisco Chronicle, December 25, 1880

To see the rest of this post, please click go to IndieBrag, where it is being hosted by a great organization of readers dedicated to finding and promoting outstanding self-published books. 

M. Louisa Locke, December 23, 2016

Holiday Promotions

BostonTholidayI thought I would let you all know about a couple of promotions I am running for the holidays. Maids of Misfortune, the first book in my Victorian San Francisco Mystery series, is still free in most ebookstores, but I have also made Uneasy Spirits, the second book in the series, FREE until 12/27 on Kindle, iTunes, Nook, Kobo, and GooglePlay.

In addition, Uneasy Spirits has just been whispersynced, which means that if you own a copy of the Kindle ebook edition you get the audiobook version for only $1.99.

For those of you like to give ebooks as gifts, a reminder that the first four books in the series is available as a boxed set for $8.99–a 40% discount.

Finally, Between Mountain and Sea, my first novel in the Paradisi Chronicles series, will be only 99 cents on Kindle between January 2-8, 2017. (Oh, just wrote 2017 for the first time!) Since I am busily working away on Under Two Moons, the sequel, you might think about getting it now (and it is free for a limited time on Kindle Unlimited as well.) 

Happy Holidays!

M. Louisa Locke

Launch of Chronicle Worlds: Paradisi

cw-paradisi-ebookFor those of you interested in my work in the open-source Science Fiction series that I helped create (see this blog piece on the origin of this series), I am proud to announce that a new anthology of short stories, Chronicle Worlds: Paradisi, set in this world, has just been launched…zooming up to the top of the Amazon best-seller Science Fiction Anthologies list.

Part of the acclaimed ‘Future Chronicles’ series of speculative fiction anthologies, published by Samuel Paralta, in Chronicle Worlds: Paradisi, twelve authors take us on an incredible journey with adventurers, scientists and colonists, as they push the boundaries against the unknown, against alien civilization, and themselves.

I am excited to have one of the stories in this anthology, “Aelwyd:Home,” which tells the story of Kammie, one of the minor characters in my full-length Paradisi Chronicles novel, Between Mountain and Sea. 

In addition, my daughter, Ashley Angelly, is one of the other authors in this collection, with “Aderyn Tanllyd: A Tale of New Eden,” the story of two Ddaeran brothers.

For a limited time, Chronicle Worlds: Paradisi is only 99 cents on Kindle. I highly recommend it as a great introduction to the whole series.

In addition, to celebrate the launch of this anthology, I am discounting Between Mountain and Sea to 99 cents, and Ashley and I are offering The Stars are Red Tonightthe novella we co-wrote in the series for Free until November 8, 2016.

MSHR1200x1800Between Mountain and Sea, a science fiction coming of age novel, introduces Mei Lin Yu, a young New Eden girl, and Mabel, her ancestor who took the journey to New Eden from Earth over a century and a half earlier. This work is part of the Paradisi Chronicles.

Mei Lin Yu should have been looking forward to the next stage in her life. As a descendant of one of the ten Founding Families who led the exodus from a dying Earth and now rule New Eden, her choices are endless. But she has never felt part of that Founding Family or the world of technological marvels and genetic perfection they created.

All that will change the summer she spends at Mynyddamore, her ancestral home in western Caelestis, wedged between Mynyddeira, New Eden’s highest mountain, and the Sapphire Sea. Here, living among the Ddaerans, the original inhabitants of New Eden, she will discover secrets her family want to keep buried and a truth about herself that will forever change her destiny.

Between Mountain and Sea is 99 cents on Kindle

StarsAreRedTonightFinal800x1200-2The year is 2092 and Earth is slowly dying, but Trevor and Saya are holding their own. They have steady work in Seattle and unlike ninety-nine percent of the planet’s residents, they aren’t starving, their city isn’t underwater, threatened by fire, ravaged by disease, or under military rule. Their jobs are boring but at least they are safe. That is until an encrypted flash drive falls into their hands. Suddenly their lives are upended and nothing will ever be the same again.

The Stars are Red Tonight is part of the Paradisi Chronicles series, a science fiction adventure through time, space and generations, brought to life through the creativity of multiple authors. In this romantic suspense novella, Ashley Angelly and Louisa Locke introduce the Kuttners, one of the ten founding families who escape a dying Earth to colonize New Eden, a planet a galaxy away.

The Stars are Red Tonight is Free on Kindle

So for under $2 you get a novel, a novella, and twelve short stories set in this exciting new series! Can’t get much better than that. 🙂