What Do a Victorian Lady and a 1940s Gal Gumshoe have in Common?: Part Two

Yesterday, M. Ruth Myers and I posted Part One of our joint interview with our two female sleuths, Maggie Sullivan and Annie Fuller. Today, Part Two of the interview concludes over on Myers’ blog. Do go on over and read it, I think you will find that these two women end up having a lot in common. Meanwhile, Uneasy Spirits, the second book in my Victorian San Francisco Mystery series, is still free today and tomorrow (1/21-22) on Kindle. Myers’ book, No Game for a Dame is free for Kindle, Nook, Apple and Kobo through Jan. 26.

What do a Victorian Lady and a 1940s Gal Gumshoe have in common?: Part One

When M. Ruth Myers and I discovered we were both promoting books in our respective historical mystery series at the same time, we thought how much fun it would be to compare the responses our female sleuths from different historical periods would make to the same questions. On the surface, Mrs. Annie Fuller, the protagonist in my Victorian San Francisco Mystery series, is a rather typical 19th century widowed woman who supports herself by running a boarding house. The fact that she supplements her income as the pretend clairvoyant, Madam Sibyl, is a secret she must protect in order to Read more…

Review of No Game for a Dame and Tough Cookie: A Gendered Twist on the Classic Detective Genre

As any one who has read my own work might guess, I enjoy historical mysteries with a strong female protagonist who is working. And, therefore, it is no surprise how delighted I was when I found M. Ruth Myer’s mystery series featuring Maggie Sullivan, a sassy female detective. I initially gave the first book in Myer’s series, No Game for a Dame, a try because I am a fan of the hard-boiled detective mysteries of Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett that are set in the 1930s and 1940s. And boy, am I glad I did. What fun it was to Read more…